International Course on Antibiotics and Resistance ICARe, 11-19 Nov 2017

Dear All:

FYI, see below an announcement of an 8-day intensive course in Paris in November 2017: “ICARe is designed for early career scientists – assistant professors, new industry scientists, MDs, and postdoctoral research associates – as well as members from developing areas contending with the practical challenge of managing the antibiotic resistance problem with limited resources. Attendance will be limited to 40 students and will reflect the global nature of the problem.”

Also keep in mind the 6-8 Sep ASM-ESCMID conference in Boston on antibacterial drug development along with its preceding co-sponsored (CARB-X + ASM-ESCMID) workshop. 

–jr

John H. Rex, MD | Chief Medical Officer, F2G Ltd. | Chief Strategy Officer, CARB-X | Expert-in-Residence, Wellcome Trust
Follow me on Twitter: @JohnRex_NewAbx


Dear Colleague,

We are organizing the second edition of the International Course on Antibiotics and Resistance (ICARe) which will be held at the Fondation Mérieux, Annecy, France, November 11-19, 2017 (download flyer and course outline here).

The specific goal of ICARe is to bring leaders in academics and industry together with trained scientists at the dawn of their careers. Cutting-edge approaches for understanding and detection of resistance, antibiotic discovery, chemical optimization, and use of strategies that minimize the development of resistance will be examined.

Our course aims at providing future leaders in the field of antibiotics and resistance with the information they do not usually get in graduate or medical school, but that they need to make a serious contribution to solving the problem. In the past, they would receive some of that training once they joined a well-established antibiotic discovery program in pharma.  But more of the needed discoveries now rely on academic researchers with little or no experience, and many are spinning out biotech ideas without really understanding the challenges.

You can use the flyer to advertise for the course and the outline is to incite you to send your most promising collaborators.

Thank you in advance for your help,

P. Courvalin, M. Gilmore, G. Wright

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